Unearthing Cranky Ladies everywhere

Cranky Ladies logoIt’s funny how when you’re aware of something, it suddenly seems to be EVERYWHERE. I suppose part of that is the fact it’s Women’s History Month, so maybe there’s a bit more prominence of women from the past being talked about, but it seems more than that! I’ve come across a few things in the last week that I wanted to link to here, because there really are a lot of great discussions out there about cranky ladies of history, and while our book is looking at things from a different perspective, anything that reminds people about these wonderful, eccentric, irascible and AWESOME women is good by me!

The Mary Sue wrote about Meryl Streep being in talks for a historical suffragette film, which sounds awesome.

Historian Clare Wright writes women back into history, with her book titled The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka (interview & review).

Tangentially related, but certainly of interest when you consider how often women are written out of history, this article from the Guardian, in which Mary Beard discusses the issue of women being told to “shut up” (from Homer to Twitter).

Well behaved women
Courtesy of @XOrdinaryWomen on Twitter

And don’t forget to check out the posts made so far as part of our Cranky Ladies of History blog tour – it’s fascinating to see who people are talking about!

This post is written as part of the Women’s History Month Cranky Ladies of History blog tour. If  you would like to read more about cranky ladies from the past, you might like to support our Pozible campaign, crowd-funding an anthology of short stories about Cranky Ladies of History from all over the world.

All the Cranky Ladies!

Cranky Ladies logoWe’re only into day 3 of our campaign and we’re over a third of the way towards funding – can you see my happy dance?! Tansy and I are so excited about the support and signal-boosting we’ve been lucky enough to receive, and want to publicly thank everyone who has already pledged, and also every single person who has posted, tweeted, blogged, Facebooked and so on about the campaign, because we know how much of a difference it makes. THANK YOU!

We’re starting to see fantastic posts about cranky ladies popping up as Women’s History Month gets underway, and we’re linking to them on the Cranky Ladies Blog Tour page – one of my favourite things about this book has been learning about historical figures I had not come across, so this blog tour is just excellent!

With the marvellous support we’ve already received, we’re adding some new rewards tiers – take a look at the Pozible site and see if anything new takes your fancy over the next couple of days! The first new tier is already up, with more to come – more cranky lady goodness!

Uppity Women of History

Cranky Ladies logoThis post is written as part of the Women’s History Month Cranky Ladies of History blog tour. If  you would like to read more about cranky ladies from the past, you might like to support our Pozible campaign, crowd-funding an anthology of short stories about Cranky Ladies of History from all over the world.

I came across the book Uppity Women of the Renaissance in my school library on Friday and immediately went and looked up what else the author, Vicki Leon, had done in the field. Turns out there’s a whole BUNCH of books under the Uppity Women banner, and I reckon they fit right in with our Cranky Ladies of History!

photo 14000 years of Uppity Women (a kind of best of the series)

Uppity Women of the Renaissance

Uppity Women of Medieval Times

Uppity Women of Ancient Times

Uppity Women of the New World

Uppity Women of Ancient Greece

You might like to add it to your Cranky Ladies of History reading list, along with Bad Girls & Wicked Women by Jan Stradling, which I’ve posted in other places about before!

 

Kicking off the Cranky Ladies blog tour: The Night Witches

Cranky Ladies logoThis post is written as part of the Women’s History Month Cranky Ladies of History blog tour. If  you would like to read more about cranky ladies from the past, you might like to support our Pozible campaign, crowd-funding an anthology of short stories about Cranky Ladies of History from all over the world.

I thought it only fitting I start the month off right with my own post! I generally would focus on Australian women of history, and I will definitely look to them later in the month, but I felt I had to write about some cranky ladies I only recently learned about, because they were just so amazing.

Katya Ryabova and Nadya Popova of the Night Witches

In World War II, the Russian 588th Air Regiment (also later known as the 46th Taman Guards Bomber Regiment) made more than 23,000 combat flights. This regiment was so successful against the Germans they were dubbed Nachthexen, Night Witches, because the pilots (and incidentally the navigators, officers and mechanics) were all women. Given obsolete equipment, the women devised techniques that made the most of the aircraft and methods of evading detection on their missions, and despite sexual harassment from male colleagues and the sleep deprivation and stress that went with the job, were collectively awarded highest military honours, and 23 members were awarded the Gold Star of Hero of the Soviet Union. 30 air crew members of the regiment died during combat, from a total of over 200 serving during the war.

While it’s perhaps a little blood-thirsty to start the month out with war heroes, I think it is important to remember that women like these played significant roles in conflict throughout history. They aren’t always recognised war heroes, they aren’t always remembered by name, but they are always there.

References: 

BitnikGr. (2010, November 2). “night witches”! female combat pilots on eastern front! part-1!. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSEro1gVbOY [Accessed: 27 Feb 2014].

Dowdy, L. (2008). Aviation – the night witches. [online] Retrieved from: http://www.seizethesky.com/nwitches/nitewtch.html [Accessed: 27 Feb 2014].

Naughton, R. (2002). Marina raskova and the soviet women pilots of world war ii. [online] Retrieved from: http://www.ctie.monash.edu.au/hargrave/soviet_women_pilots.html [Accessed: 27 Feb 2014].

Night Witches. (2014, January 15). [online] Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_Witches [Accessed: 27 Feb 2014].

Noggle, A. (1994). A dance with death. College Station: Texas A & M University Press.