Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror reprints

We would like to congratulate all our authors whose works will appear in the 2012 Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror (from Ticonderoga Publications, July 2013). In particular, three stories first published by FableCroft will be reprinted! Well done to Thoraiya Dyer (“Sleeping Beauty” from Epilogue), Faith Mudge (“Oracle’s Tower” from To Spin a Darker Stair) and Tansy Rayner Roberts (“What Books Survive” from Epilogue). Lovely news!

Speaking of news, we’ve started a new page on this website called “FableCroft Books in Review“, where we link to online reviews of our books – check it out to see what reviewers have been saying about us!

More awards niceness

We already posted about our appearance on the Ditmar Awards ballot (don’t forget to vote for your favourite works, if you’re eligible to). Today the Chronos Awards ballot has been announced and we’re delighted to have more works on there too! The Chronos Awards are for Victorian creators, and there are some fantastic works on the ballot. If you are a full or supporting member of Continuum, you are eligible to vote, or voting memberships may also be purchased (details here). Congratulations to everyone on the ballot!

Best Long Fiction

Bread and Circuses by Felicity Dowker (Ticonderoga Publications)

Salvage by Jason Nahrung (Twelfth Planet Press)

Walking Shadows by Narrelle M. Harris (Clan Destine Press)

Year’s Best Australian Fantasy & Horror 2011 edited by Liz Grzyb and Talie Helene (Ticonderoga Publications)

Dyson’s Drop by Paul Collins (Ford Street Publishing)

No Award

Best Short Fiction

“Five Ways to Start a War” by Sue Bursztynski in Light Touch Paper Stand Clear, edited by Edwina Harvey and Simon Petrie (Peggy Bright Books)

“The Mornington Ride” by Jason Nahrung in Epilogue, edited by Tehani Wessely (FableCroft Publishing)

“Nematalien” by LynC in The Narratorium, edited by David Grigg

“Fireflies” by Steve Cameron in Epilogue (FableCroft Publishing)

“The D_d” by Adam Browne in Light Touch Paper Stand Clear, edited by Edwina Harvey and Simon Petrie (Peggy Bright Books)

No Award

Best Fan Writer

Alexandra Pierce

Jason Nahrung

Nalini Haynes

Bruce Gillespie

Grant Watson

Steve Cameron

No Award

Best Fan Written Work

Reviewing New Who series by David McDonald, Tansy Rayner Roberts and Tehani Wessely

No Award

Best Fan Artist

Dick Jenssen

No Award

Best Fan Artwork

“The Entellechy” by Dick Jenssen, cover art for Interstellar Ramjet Scoop for ANZAPA 267 edited by Bill Wright

No Award

Best Fan Publication

Dark Matter Fanzine (www.darkmatterfanzine.com), by Nalini Hayes

SF Commentary, (http://efanzines.com/SFC/) edited by Bruce Gillespie

Viewing Clutter, DVD and Blu-ray reviews blog (http://georgeivanoff.com.au/other-writing/reviews/viewing-clutter/), by George Ivanoff

No Award

Best Achievement

Continuum 8: Craftonomicon (51st Australian National SF Convention) Program by Julia Svaganovic, Emma Hespa Mann, and Caitlin Noble

“Snapshot 2012″ by Alisa Krasnostein, Kathryn Linge, David McDonald, Helen Merrick, Ian Mond, Jason Nahrung, Alex Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, Tehani Wessely and Sean Wright

No Award

Best Artwork

The award for Best Artwork is not being presented due to insufficient nominations being received.

So you’ve written a book… What now?

Screen shot 2013-04-13 at 8.43.51 PMToday I presented for CBCA Tasmania on the topic of publishing. It was a well attended session and I thoroughly enjoyed both the preparation of the presentation and the talk itself. I spoke for nearly an hour and a half (thankfully there were questions too!) and was followed by Nella talking about the nuts and bolts (things like ISBNs, CiP application, legal deposit and so on) and Richard, who gave a brief overview on copyright for authors. My part focussed on the various options authors have for getting published, focussing on traditional, boutique and self-publishing routes. My presentation is made available to download here, for the purposes of the participants, but I don’t mind who else reads it (and it is licensed under Creative Commons, so you are welcome to use it under the licence conditions).

Obviously I spoke a lot more than what is contained on the presentation but you get the gist.

I didn’t really talk a lot about the specifics of marketing your book (whether you self-publish or not, you still need to market!) but did mention that it’s always useful to have ephemera such as bookmarks or postcards to pass out to potential readers and that Vistaprint has been having some excellent deals (you have to be patient and wait for free upload combined with discounts/freebies for the best bargains, but these do happen!). It also occurred to me that I might have spoken in more detail about social networking, but I think that’s a whole other session!

Thanks to all the participants who seemed to find the information useful, and particularly to Nella, both for inviting me and for practising her grandma skills so successfully with the baby I had in tow!

ETA: A couple more useful links that are relevant!

10 ways self publishing has changed the world

A contractual obligation (looking at contracts and what you are signing)

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.

New book! Canterbury 2100 edited by Dirk Flinthart

Canterbury-2100-coverAs part of the year of doing all the things here at FableCroft, we’ve just republished the very excellent collaborative anthology*  Canterbury 2100: pilgrimages in a new world edited by Dirk Flinthart.

Originally published by Agog! in 2008, Canterbury 2100 sold out its print edition some time ago, and we decided (in consultation with the editor, previous publisher, and the authors) that it was too good a book to disappear. It’s with great pleasure we bring Canterbury 2100 back to the world with an ebook edition (currently only on Kindle, but more options to follow).

FableCroft would like to thank the editor, Dirk Flinthart, the orignal publisher, Cat Sparks at Agog!, the authors, and the cover artist Nick Stathopoulos, for agreeing to be part of the project again.

You want to know more?

Six hundred years ago, a group of pilgrims made their way to Canterbury, and Geoffrey Chaucer created one of the great works of English literature. A hundred years from now, a nuclear-powered steam train is stopped by a massive storm on its journey to Canterbury, the new capital of an England struggling to rise from the ashes of the twenty-first century. As the waters rise with the storm’s fury, the weird and wonderful passengers tell the stories of a new age…

18 original short stories interwoven with a narrative thread that twines together the pieces to depict a fictional future exploring the stories that the people of that future tell each other.

Contents

Introduction (Dirk Flinthart)
The Tingler’s Tale (Geoffrey Maloney)
The Nun’s Tale (Angela Slatter)
The Dead Priest’s Tale (Martin Livings)
The Veteran’s Tale (Stephen Dedman)
The Miner’s Tale (Laura E Goodin)
The Sky-Chief’s Tale (Sue Isle)
The Census-Taker’s Tale (Kaaron Warren)
The Mathematician’s Tale (Durand Welsh)
The Doctor’s Tale (Ben Bastian)
The Hunter’s Tale (Grant Watson)
The Peat-Digger’s Tale (Thoraiya Dyer)
The Metawhore’s Tale (Lee Battersby)
The Janus’s Tale (Penelope Love)
The Lighterman’s Tale (Trent Jamieson)
The Carbon-Knitter’s Tale (Rita de Heer)
The Evangelist’s Tale (L L Hannett)
The Gnomologist’s Tale (Matthew Chrulew)
The Conductor’s Tale (Lyn Battersby)
Afterword (Dirk Flinthart)

* I just made that phrase up – read the book and you’ll know why!